2022 points of interest...

The IRS has announced:

Key filing dates:


  • The IRS will most likely set the opening day of the 2022 tax filing season between Jan 15 and Feb 15, 2022. That is the soonest the IRS will begin accepting and processing 2021 tax returns


Reconcile advance Child Tax Credit payments

  • If you received advance payments, when you file your 2021 tax return, you will need to compare the advance Child Tax Credit payments that you received during 2021 with the amount of the Child Tax Credit that you can properly claim on your 2021 tax return. 
  • If you received less than the amount that you're eligible for, you'll claim a credit for the remaining amount of Child Tax Credit on your 2021 tax return. If you received more than the amount that you're eligible for, you may need to repay some or all of that excess payment when you file.
  • In January 2022, the IRS will send you Letter 6419 to provide the total amount of advance Child Tax Credit payments that you received in 2021. You need to keep this and any other IRS letters you received about advance CTC payments you received with your tax records and refer to them when you file.
See Reconciling Your Advance Child Tax Credit Payments on Your 2021 Tax Return for more information.



Claim Recovery Rebate Credit

  • The third round of Economic Impact Payments was issued starting in March 2021 and continue through December 2021. The third round of Economic Impact Payments, including the plus-up payments, were advance payments of the 2021 Recovery Rebate Credit claimed on a 2021 tax return
  • In early 2022, the IRS will send you Letter 6475 to provide the total amount of the third Economic Impact Payment and any Plus-Up payments that you received. You need to keep this and any other IRS letters you received about your stimulus payments with your tax records and refer to them when you file. Or you can log in to your online account to securely access your Economic Impact Payment amounts. If you are claiming a 2021 Recovery Rebate Credit, you will need the total amount of your third Economic Impact payment and any plus up payments to file your return accurately and avoid a refund delay.

See IRS.gov/rrc for more information.



Avoid refund delays and understand refund timing

  • Many different factors can affect the timing of your refund after your tax return is filed.  Although the IRS issues most refunds in less than 21 days, the IRS cautions taxpayers not to rely on receiving a refund by a certain date, especially when making major purchases or paying bills.  Some returns may require additional review and may take longer. For example, the IRS, along with its partners in the tax industry, continue to strengthen security reviews to help protect against identity theft and refund fraud. Additionally, refunds for people claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) can't be issued before mid-February. The law requires the IRS to hold the entire refund − even the portion not associated with EITC or ACTC.
  • Some returns may need manual review delaying the processing if IRS systems detect a possible error, is missing information, or there is suspected identity theft or fraud.  Some of these situations require the IRS to correspond with taxpayers, but some do not.  This work does require special handling by an IRS employee so, in these instances, it may take the IRS more than the normal 21 days to issue any related refund. In those cases where IRS is able to correct the return without corresponding, the IRS will send an explanation to the taxpayer.